Tagged: Study

News Article: Make Maths Compulsory Until 18, Leading Scientists Urge

“Britain continues to lag far behind other countries when it comes to maths education, even though the problems were identified more than a decade ago. In 2009, the UK came 28th in an international educational league table in maths based on the skills of 15-year-olds – well behind many European and east Asian countries.”

See the article in the Independent, here:

News Article: Highest Paid Jobs in the UK 2011 (Hint: Most require strong maths skills)

Looking through this list, it becomes apparent very quickly that the highest paid members of society have to be numerate.

See the original article in the Guardian here.

1. Head of a major organisation

There is a great deal of statistical analysis required here for producing and understanding reports. Basic numeracy skills are needed to consider budgets, priorities, staff costs, rates, etc. A degree in Economics would be a common stepping stone to this job, which contains a great deal of maths work.

2. Medical Practictioner

Very strong maths qualifications are required to gain a place on the courses that lead to these jobs e.g. a degree in Medicine. There is also a great deal of mathematical work on these courses.

3. Senior National Government Official

Similar to the head of an organisation, there is a great deal of business management knowledge required here – Economics degrees are common.

4. Airline Pilot

To gain entry into pilot Training Programmes, candidates need to pass an exam which demonstrates strong maths skills.

5. Dental Practitioner

Similar to a degree in Medicine, a degree in Dentistry requires strong  maths skills.

At the other end of the scale, the worst paid jobs were also detailed:

Follow Link Here

News Article: GCSEs not fit for purpose, says CBI

“GCSEs encourage “teaching to the test” and may be past their sell-by date, according to Britain’s leading business organisation.”

Follow link for the original article in The Guardian here

Good luck to everyone taking maths exams in the next few weeks!

Good Luck over the coming weeks!

Here are a few exam pointers that will help you to make the most of each exam:

Before the exam:

  • Get a good night’s sleep before the exam
  • Have a nourishing breakfast in the morning (and lunch, if your exam is in the afternoon)
  • Make sure you have the right tools for your exam. Do you need your calculator? Tracing paper? Compasses?
  • Arrive in plenty of time so that you can enter the exam hall feeling calm and composed.

During the exam:

  • Read ALL the instructions on the front page.
  • Work through the questions methodically, allowing time to check over your answers before the exam finishes.
    • Read each question carefully
    • Show ALL your working, step by step
    • Draw graphs and diagrams IN PENCIL
    • Write your answer in the space provided, using the correct:
      • format (were you asked to give the equation of a line in the form ax+by+c=0, or y=mx+c?)
      • units (should your  calculator be in degrees or radians mode? did you convert all measurements to cm or m?)
      • accuracy (significant figures, decimal places)
    • check your answer where possible (e.g. if you solved for x, check the LHS and RHS of your equation!)
  • Remain relaxed during the exam – if a question makes you feel anxious, skip it and come back to it later

If you start to panic: STOP. Put down your pen, rest your hands and look straight ahead. Take a couple of deep, calming breaths. Remind yourself that you can get through this better if you just relax.

  • Check through your answers at the end – many silly mistakes can be fixed at this time

After the exam:

  • Relax. DON’T dwell on what you might have done right or wrong.
  • Take a moment to be proud of yourself for trying your best.
  • Move on to revision for your next exam.

Please also read this BBC Article about general exam technique for some pointers.

News Article: Schools Maths Should Be More Practical, say Teenagers

A new City & Guilds report shows that while teenagers recognise that maths can be useful in real life, they feel that the maths taught at school can be irrelevant to their needs

See link to original article from the BBC News website here